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(( Got another five star review!  AMAZING!  So happy! ))

Just because you’re paranoid…

By J. Barker on September 26, 2014
Format: Paperback
Eleven-year-old Dax Praxx has been committed to a mental institution where he is to be held until the time comes when he is to be tried….for the murder of his parents. His freedom, and possibly his life, are hanging in the balance. While some of the people he meets during his incarceration profess to be genuinely concerned for his welfare, none of them gain his trust, and none of them seem to believe in his professed innocence. There’s damning circumstantial evidence piled against him, but the most insurmountable object to winning his case: he himself can’t remember what happened on the fateful night of his parents’ death. As his situation becomes more dire and his enemies multiply, only his driving desire to discover the truth and be reunited with his beloved younger sister keeps him going.

While it’s evident from this summary that “Dax Praxx” is both a mystery and a prison drama of sorts, what is not immediately obvious is that it’s also a science fiction story. Even those who don’t ordinarily seek out sci-fi fiction will be well-served by reading this tale, though, because the novel does not rely on its fantastic elements, instead only using them in the background in an almost incidental way. One reads through large swaths of the story with nary a reminder that it’s set in either a time or a place other than our own, until a prop pops us to remind us that these people are somewhat more advanced than us—-in technology, that is, but not evidently in compassion or a sense of justice. This is not a hardcore genre piece.

What it is, though, is an extraordinarily fine character study. Dax is a child prodigy with an off-the-charts IQ whose brilliance had isolated him from his peers long before society isolated him behind the walls of a penal institution. Armed with an endless supply of technical know-how and a sharp, sarcastic wit, he’s an understandably angry young man who strikes out at everyone around him, with sometimes tragic results. The world has conspired against him at every turn, so when a hand is offered to him in genuine friendship it’s difficult to blame him for slapping it away in suspicion. Through it all Dax retains a deeply empathetic core of humanity, the image of his sister keeping his hope alive but receding ever further into the distance as his sentence drags on. I would think that this story would resonate particularly strongly with anyone who’s ever felt confined (or has literally been confined) by circumstances beyond their control with no ally in sight to stand alongside them.

This tale offers numerous twists and turns, including a genuinely shocking and memorable revelation when the truth of what happened on the night in question is finally revealed to the reader and to Dax himself. But what rises above everything else in sight is the portrait painted of the protagonist. TN Templeton does a magnificent job of placing us in the shoes of a fascinating, deeply sympathetic character, and eloquently limns the world that he’s able to construct for himself built out of memories, hopes, and stacks and stacks of notebooks that he’s filled with scribbles that may or may not be able to provide him with salvation. It’s a journey well worth taking with this particular traveling companion; I’m certainly glad that I did.

tonystarksass:

tony stark + text posts   

insp.

(via forgetcolenot)

Thirteen Year Old Boy Genius Kills Parents

oddender:

Little bit of experimenting.

wildparsnip:

my mom is on the phone with my dad (a microbiologist) and she told him “go to bed, turn off the computer, and just, just don’t do science. don’t do any science”

(via notcuddles)

delusionalgurl:

not a day passed not thinking about this pretty boy’s death

Fucking hell.

delusionalgurl:

not a day passed not thinking about this pretty boy’s death

Fucking hell.

(Source: nyamcattt, via tunama)

cloakstone69:

dublubby314:

My mother says that fanfiction doesn’t count as reading because “it isn’t nearly as good as the stuff that’s published. You’re not going to find something online that will win a Booker Prize.”
Please reblog if you count fan fiction as reading, or if the fanfiction you’ve read is equally as good as published novels. I want to see the figures.

*crushes mouse while hitting reblog button*

If it helps, I’m a published author who writes fanfiction

(Source: lordofthesacks, via certified-fujoshi)

neil-gaiman:

ellenkushner:

maggie-stiefvater:

Novelist error messages.

Too perfect!

ARGGH

iraffiruse:

Machine Porn

(via journalsarepointless)

oddender:

VIdeo!  Watch me be awkward with AllynBrett, wandering around!  He was supposed to put my book link the comments, but alas, he did not… So I’ll add it here ^_^ My book: Clicky clicky

Once upon a whisper…

oddender:

The only light on her face was the dim glow of the computer screen and the faint rays of the sun trying to slide its way through cracks in curtains or over the poorly fitted door frame that led to the outside world.  It was just enough to remind her that night had become day again, but sleep wasn’t a concern.  It should be, she knew, but time itself often seemed like an endless loop.  The cracks of sun might as well have been from a roommate, not too keen on keeping the light turned off when she wanted to sleep.

A futile glance at the bottom corner of her screen reminded her that though she didn’t keep track of time, others did.  The numbers stood faintly against the black bar: 11:41.  Almost noon.  What did that mean?

Her roommate would be up in three hours.  The kids she loved to watch, whose books and horrible music CDs were scattered around her living space, would probably be going to lunch soon.  She needed to call the doctor’s office again, before they closed.  Hours were left that could they could be called, but with her sleep being as sporatic as it was, it really should be done now…

Still, her fingers moved steadily on the keys.  The blue of her eyes masked by the reflected glow against her glasses even as they flickered up to catch a fleeting glimpse of the horror movie playing in the background.  She’d seen it before, there was no real reason to look up, but she did anyways to break through the barrier of text forming up around her mind.

(( This has been on queue, waiting for me to finish it, since I joined Tumblr… It was meant to be a self introduction post, but uh… yeah.  Pardon the fact that it’s not done. ))

Reblogged from my main.